Council on Social Work Education Nine Core Competencies

 

Competency 1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior

Ethical conduct in practice is rooted in the core values of the social work profession. Applying competency practice behaviors combined with the National Association of Social Workers code of ethics has become a trusted manual for ethical decision-making in practice situations. Ethical decision-making requires social workers to effectively use reflection and self-manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice settings. The macro-level change opportunity developed competency behaviors of ethical conduct of research, seeking feedback and guidance from supervisor, professional behavior, and using technology appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes.

(Documentation: Reflection Journals, Ethical Dilemma Paper, and Professional Paper)

Competency 2: Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice

            Communicating effectively with students of diversity and difference in practice was developed by removing cross cultural barriers; to meet students where they are at and not where I believed they needed to be. Effective communication with students increased their trust in me resulting in increased understanding of their life experiences which are impacting their lives. Developing my practice behaviors of self-awareness and self-regulation were necessary so that personal values or opinions did not influence students. The combination of effective communication, building trust, understanding student’s environments, and self-awareness allowed me to engage students of diversity and difference to present themselves as learners as experts of their own experiences. Development occurred while assisting students with scholarships, however, here is an example; I assisted a young Native girl in telling her story which involved developing a positive identity in her own words.

(Documentation: Reflection Journals, Professional Development Paper)

Competency 3: Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice

Advocating for the voiceless, advancing human rights, and implementing the macro-level change opportunity on human trafficking. Engaging in practices that advance social, economic, and environmental justice was developed through multiple channels, however, only two will be discussed. Engaging high school students by participating in a youth mentoring program to prevent violence against women I co-presented on human trafficking. I also engaged middle school students by facilitating social conversation groups on human trafficking further developing my practice behaviors.

(Documentation: Reflection Journals)

Competency 4: Engage in Practice-Informed Research and Research-Informed Practice

TRIO Educational Talent Search is a government funded program which engages students based on practice-informed research and research-informed practice. Assisting a homeless student to obtain housing, financial aid, and college admission as the intervention method is statistically proven to increase the student’s opportunities and to reduce the chance of staying/becoming homeless in the future. Engaging with a student from Ethiopia who needed assistance to determine college options required an intake assessment, intervention chosen was based on proven research methods. Research also indicates that the intervention selected for the student from Ethiopia will increase opportunities and break the poverty cycle.

(Documentation: Reflection Journals, Client Intervention 1, Client Intervention 2)

Competency 5: Engage in Policy Practice

A social policy at the local, state, and federal levels impacting service delivery and access to students of TRIO Educational Talent Search involved policies with immigration, taxes, educational, housing, and funding sources. Students encountered delays with financial applications when the Internal Revenue Service began requesting each student to verify income regardless of if they had a job. Immigration issues arrived when schools began requesting students to prove their citizenship status, residency status, they were also asking for passports, student visas, and alien status. Approximately forty students participated in a TRIO Days trip to the state capitol where a live debate was being held on the Collective Bargaining Bill. Engaging in policy practice through identification, assessment, and analysis was applied throughout the semester.

(Documentation: Reflection Journals)

Competency 6: Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, Communities

Applying knowledge of human behavior and social environment while engaging students in group discussions have enhanced this practice behavior. Understanding diversity and difference in the student population and the subjects being covered has required empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills. Students have discussed social issues such as cyber-bullying, internet safety, and human trafficking along with discovering possible careers, moving to the next grade level, and aptitude testing.

(Documentation: Reflection Journals, Career Assessment, Personal Aptitude)

 Competency 7: Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Applying practice behaviors into context to assess individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities can be seen using an assortment of assessments with students. I developed practice behaviors and skills while working with students processing intake assessments, need assessments, and the career and aptitude assessment. Developing mutually agreed on goals and objectives can be observed throughout the semester as I worked with a student from Ethiopia. Beginning with an intake needs assessment to determine his strengths, needs, and personal values an intervention was developed that was agreeable to the student.

(Documentation: Reflection Journals, Career and Aptitude Assessment, Needs Assessment)

Competency 8: Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, Communities

A student I have worked with from Ethiopia returned to complete his FASFA, contact the college admissions office, and review the study plan. This reflects how the agreed upon goal was implemented. Using inter-professional collaboration practice behaviors were improved throughout the change process as seen in reflection journals. Multicultural approaches were taken to develop interventions designed to benefit students, families, and their communities. Combining the multicultural approach along with negotiating, mediating, and advocating on behalf of clients was demonstrated through several human trafficking presentations I participated in ending with phasing out of my internship and presenting the change process to the agency.

(Documentation: Reflection Journals, Academic Probation)

 Competency 9: Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, or Communities

            Developing my evaluative practice behaviors with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities is evident throughout the macro-level change process. Several appropriate methods were designed and used throughout the change process to analyze, monitor, and evaluate the intervention and improve change effectiveness. A social media survey, student evaluation survey, monitoring checklist were selected to track the change and document findings. After the implementation, the change was reassessed and stabilized.

(Documentation: Reflection Journals, Social Media Survey, Student Evaluation Survey, Monitoring Checklist)

Ethical Dilemma Paper

            The client is a ninth-grade student at North high school and is currently enrolled in TRIO Talent Search of Briar Cliff University. The ethical dilemma occurred on the practice field which for TRIO at North high school is in the counseling offices during the initial meeting with the client. As the client and myself begin to discuss how the year was going, go over first semester grades, and check in with clients it was clear that the client was pregnant.

As the client and I began discussing her upcoming pregnancy, the due date, and plans that the first ethical dilemma in this situation arose. The client confirmed that she had very little resources provided by the school to assist her with the pregnancy those services are offered at a different school and she did not want to go there. Later I would speak with Heather about this and have it confirmed that the general attitude at the school is “she will do fine it is a Hispanic thing”.

TRIO Talent Search of Briar Cliff University is an agency which has a primary focus on doing whatever it takes to aid the client in getting into postsecondary education. The United States Department of Education set up TRIO Talent Search with the purpose of assisting at-risk students including those who were at risk for pregnancy and have programs within each Talent Search program for situations like this (U.S. Department of Education, 2014).

The program advisor for the client should have done a needs assessment per the program policies stated in the program guidelines established by the United States Department of Education on high-risk youth (U.S. Department of Education, 2014). The client was not approached regarding her situation, asked if she needed services, referrals, resources, if she was safe, the baby was safe, and to further compound this issue pertains to the advisor also being the program director.

As a future social worker, this issue is in violation of the NASW Code of Ethics, service which explains how the social worker’s primary goal is to help people in need and address social problems (NASW, 2008). The ethical code does not indicate that the client’s race, ethnicity, or cultural background should be a decision-making factor in whether the client receives services, resources, or referrals.

Using the hierarchy principles when analyzing the ethical dilemma from a professional perspective allowed me to see a clearer picture of where broader changes could be made going forward. Processing through the principles of hierarchy principle two strives to nurture equality while addressing inequality could not be rectified for the client based on the level of oppression (Zastrow & Kirst-Ashman, 2016, p. 99).

During the initial meeting with the client, she was beginning her final stages of pregnancy and is expected to give birth to her son two weeks prior to the end of her freshman year. The client stated that she would remain at home with her mother and son while her boyfriend would remain with his grandmother. The boyfriend’s grandmother would be the babysitter for the baby while the mother and father went to school at north high school which does not have a daycare. Client stated that the school did not offer her any support or guidance for her pregnancy and suggested that she transfer to West where they have a daycare center.

Principle one, protection of life is one of the most important principles of social work and this is where the client and I began discussing action plans going forward. The client had indicated a stable current situation the concern was would it remain stable. I asked the client if it would be okay for me to locate some resources for housing, food, clothing, and medical for after the baby was born so she could have a backup plan and she agreed.

Principle two seeks to nurture equality and address inequality and this is where I found that my second ethical dilemma was. The client is very young and is Mexican-American, and she should have equal access to all services, however, I am very concerned about her age becoming a barrier to services. The second is her race becoming a barrier compounding the issue with her age creating a nearly impossible situation.

Principle three allowed me to aid my client with her decision to keep and raise her child through autonomy, self-determination, independence, and freedom (Zastrow & Kirst-Ashman, 2016 p. 99). I would assist my client to foster self-determination was beneficial when the client requested information on resources for food banks, prenatal programs, and parenting classes.

Principle four asks social workers to always look for a way to choose the least harm to those who are involved in the decisions and in the results (Zastrow & Kirst-Ashman, 2016 p. 99).

Offering the client resources that were requested by the client for the baby and the client and additional information for a backup plan on housing and daycare were created for an action plan. The action plan was agreed upon by the client and I believed it indicated having the least harm on those involved in the situation.

Principle five is the overall wellbeing of the family involved and this became a slightly more challenging situation. According to the client between the information I have provided, the action plan the family has in place the client believes the overall wellbeing of the family will be well after the child is born. My concern is the age of the client and her lack of experience when dealing with newborns. To combat this concern, I would have provided the client with phone numbers for both Mercy and Unity hospitals that offer parenting classes for newborns.

Principle six and principle seven look at confidentiality of the client and honesty when working with other staff members while holding client confidentiality at the highest priority. The client would be aware that I may need to speak with other staff members with TRIO, Briar Cliff University social work department, and school staff for direction. I would explain that no information identifying her would be given beyond that.

Not only individuals but family members and groups were also impacted because of the ethical dilemma. The clients lack could have been more informed and had resources in place possibly preventing any issues with lack of medical care. The client’s family could have benefitted from an intervention rather than having to face this situation alone. There are options for teenage girls who are pregnant. There are many avenues for these young teens including parenting classes that offer baby items for each educational course they take, prenatal assistance, medical coordinators, and several other assistance programs including housing options for young mothers. Families do not need to feel alone or isolated in these challenging times.

The ethical dilemma had a negative cultural and racial tone with it and taking the ethical dilemma and making it even a more sensitive issue. In addition to the information discussed the NASW Code of Ethics, 1.05 (a) on cultural competency and social diversity, explaining that it is a social worker’s responsibility to understand the culture and its function in human behavior and society, recognizing the strengths that exist in all cultures (NASW, 2008). Rather than disregarding the client for being Hispanic and pregnant and does not deserve help, the proper thing for the TRIO director should have is to recognize the person, the strength of the culture, and then assist the client however possible.

Resources would have been obtained outside the agencies information base for the client. The information would have included Women, Infants and Children and (WIC), food banks, Siouxland Housing, Baby Health Center for Iowa, and Child Care Aware (child care programs of Iowa). The client is going to the Siouxland Community Healthcare Center and I would have suggested speaking to a social worker before the baby is born so that she would have somebody checking on her. I would have also explained if she was not comfortable with this there is also HOPE with the Crittenden Center and that she may qualify for this and they would be able to assist her in-house to work with her in the beginning.

In closing, the client would have benefitted from either the school or the TRIO Talent Search advisor handling the situation appropriately. The response to a student who is coming to a professional with a pregnancy should not be she will be fine it is a cultural thing. As indicated throughout this ethical dilemma paper there are many avenues that could have been done differently and benefitted the client.

The client should be the primary focus unless there is a conflicting principle to indicate otherwise. In this situation that was not the case causing leaving a client to make adult decisions about a baby with a young father. The client should have had further opportunities to discuss her plans, to develop a plan of action. In a situation such as this; resources, education, and a backup plan are beneficial and the client should have knowledge of all her options.

Resources:

National Association of Social Workers (NASW). (approved 1996, revised 2008). Code of etethics ofhe National Association of Social Workers. Washington, DC: NASW. Retrieved from  http://www.socialworkers.org/pubs/code/default.asp.

  1. S. Department of Education.(2014, October 14).Talent Search Program. Retrieved                                    from https://www2.ed.gov/programs/triotalent/index.html

Zastrow, C., & Kirst-Ashman, K. K. (2016). Understanding human behavior and the social environment. Australia: Cengage Learning

 Professional Development Paper

Achieving my professional self, started over two years ago when I received a phone call from Liz Remoldt discussing the possibility of acceptance into the social work program.  It was within a week or so from that phone call that I was officially accepted, enrolled in my courses, and started a new phase of my development.

During my first semester, I was enrolled in statistics, in addition to other courses, however, it was during my statistics course that all of the old feelings of inadequacy, old messages, feelings, and so forth came roaring back to the forefront. I had believed I was past all of this, having gone through many hours of crisis counseling with the Pastor at my church. This first semester was by far the toughest on me since I was not only facing a challenging course of statistics I was facing old haunts too.

The point is, I learned a valuable tool or skill that has benefited me since that semester and I have used this skill in my internship. I found during that semester that when I found myself convinced I was a failure, or devastated because I was struggling, or paralyzed in fear and unable to see a way out, I need to pause in my thinking. This meant I needed to realize if this belief, fear, or whatever came from me or from somewhere else and then resolve it from there. I found that many of my perceptions were not mine but were planted there over many years of psychological abuse by the men in my life.

Today, when I have those same feelings of inadequacy, insecurity, perfectionism, or paralyzed with fear I generally can recognize the physically feeling rather quickly and pause. I will journal, meditate, or have a very quick chat with God to resolve the issue and can generally calm my nerves quickly. It has not happened much in my internship since I have learned to trust God to put me in the right places with the right people. However, the skill of self-awareness and self-regulation, being mindful of what I am thinking before I act on it has enhanced my professional self beyond what I could have imagined when my journey began and I trust as I continue to learn and grow it will only improve.

My professional self is growing by recognizing the importance of competencies 2a, 2b and 2c. At North Middle and North High, I have a unique opportunity to work with a diverse population with roughly seventy percent of the students being of a non-white race. Students also represent a very dispersed socioeconomic background adding to the diversity of the group. It has been an amazing experience; however, I can see the frustration on both ends when I do not always understand their English and I speak to quickly for my students to understand me. I have found that explaining to students that it is okay to say to me “slow down, I can’t keep up” or something like that is okay with me. I have explained that I speak fast and that I am working on slowing my rate of speech down but I tend to forget and I need their help. In return they have been allowing me to have them repeat words or phrases I do not understand and this has reduced the frustration levels on both sides (competency 2a).

One of the most profound growth spurts I have had since I began is with practice behavior 2b, working with clients (students) and empowering them as they become learners (through education), to become experts of their own experiences. I discovered I tend to “do” rather than “educate” when I am asked for assistance. During the first week of observing Heather, I noticed when students asked her for assistance she would guide them through multiple processes, show them where to locate information, and patiently explain the reasons they needed to be able to this on their own. The only times Heather “did” something for a student is when it required adult intervention and I went home each night that week and observed my interaction with my children, neighbors, family and realized I did not do this and began working toward educating rather than doing. Having been mindful on this practice behavior from week one has allowed me to successfully integrate the practice behavior into my internship and interaction with the students (competency 2b).

It would be wonderful to say I have no biases or prejudices at all, however, I really do not want to be a liar on top of all that too. I try very hard to not judge others, I certainly do not want to be judged, but as I face reality I am human and I have been raised in a society that whether I like it or not has had a bit of influence on me to cast judgment. I apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage personal biases prejudices (competency 2c). Each night before I go to bed I look back over my day and review it, I look at trivial things nagging me, tiny resentments, and so forth, and I can usually see when I have done something inappropriate or wrong that needs to be corrected and I go back and correct it the next day or as soon as possible.

When I was accepted into the social work program it seemed like I received an invisible toolbox to store and carry all the tools/skills I would need to use as a professional social worker. Throughout the course of my study as I learned additional information such as how to conduct research, theories, helping skills, history of social work, the social work greats, social policy, the code of ethics, and group practice I have continued to add these tools to my toolbox. Recently I have added the competency practice behaviors, a how to guide on how to select the proper tools for the right situation (courtesy of Social Work Department), and implementing tools in practice (internship/Heather). If I did not utilize the tools in my toolbox I am sure I would be experiencing stunted growth rather than healthy consistent growth of my social work identity.

Agency Paper Assignment

Trio programs are Federal outreach and student support programs designed to identify and provide services for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds. Trio is an umbrella program, offering eight educational programs that fall under this heading, each program designed to target a specific population.

The program I am interning for this semester is Talent Search. The Talent Search program is designed to identify and assist students from disadvantaged backgrounds who possess a high potential to succeed academically and in higher education. Two-thirds of the students participating in the Talent Search program are from low-income families and are first generation college students or they fall into the other category, the other category generally means they could be successful in higher education but lack skills in other areas.

Talent Search works with students in grades sixth through twelfth and offer an array of services that are grade appropriate. College preparation programs offered through Talent Search include exposure to college campuses, information on financial aid, assistance with financial aid forms, assistance with scholarship applications, college exam preparations, workshops for families of participants, career exploration, and aptitude assessments.

Talent Search offers other services for students which include tutorial services, counseling, mentoring programs, education counseling services, work with outside resources including educational advisors and educational counselors, offer programs and activities for underrepresented students with disabilities, are from foster care, or homeless youth. Talent Search Advisors work with students in a variety of situations who struggle with citizenship, displacement, aging out of the system, and many other life struggles adolescents face that impact their education and the mentoring and counseling is offered.

The Trio programs including the Talent Search program is one hundred percent Federally Funded by a grant from the United States Department of Education. Every five years, Heather Nissen, the Director of Talent Search submits an updated grant with to the United States Department of Education, showing her new budget, projects past and going forward, her data on past and current student success and staff budgeting. The services the offered by Talent Search, including all activities the students are offered to participate on are free to the student.

My role with Talent Search is working with Heather Nissen who is the Director of the program. This has granted me a unique opportunity to experience more than completing my internship with an advisor. I have been able to participate in Trio meetings, school meetings, and financial meetings that are not typical for those who are not in administrative positions.

My role typically is to work with students in grades sixth through twelfth and offer a variety of services. I have found that because the population I am working with is adolescents no two days are alike and because of the time of year I have not been able to start true group work yet but there is plenty of time for that. I have spent time at the high school getting to know the seniors. The juniors have been more receptive to working with me.

I have listened a lot, asked probing questions, which challenges the students to think about what they are thinking, some students need to work on a game plan, others come for a specific reason, and the goal is that next week I will start running small groups sessions with juniors of about 5 kids each. And that I will work with middle school kids on different topics in I

I am not confident in what my role is to be honest. I show up and ask Heather what she would like me to do and she explains what she would like for the day. However, kids show up unannounced and other don’t, I have students that are not Trio that Heather would like to help but shouldn’t so I am able to help (and I really like to help them, plus these are usually the students from other countries and are just lovely to work with).

When I consider Trio in the larger community I see only a positive impact with the programs offered. When I first spoke with Heather and then the internship could be sealed I was speaking to my niece who completed her degree at South Dakota State University and was involved with Trio. While at North High and North Middle I am amazed at how many students and staff arrive to make sure their students, brothers, sister, relatives, and so forth are in the program or receive applications. The word is out that Trio programs and Talent Search offers a service that is having a positive impact on its target population.

Talent Search’s relationship to other social service agencies varies depending on the agency. For example, the counselors at the schools that Talent Search works with collaborate well with the advisors and work on behalf of the student. However, not all the educators are willing to work with Talent Search advisors on behalf of students and instead will not allow students to visit with their advisor.

North High School, due to the location in the Sioux City School District is the most diversely populated schools in the district. Family incomes range from extreme poverty where parents are working multiple jobs and the children raise themselves, to the other extreme where the wealth is vast and one parent stays home and the children are spoiled. Both genders are represented in the school, there are very few white students at the school, approximately 70% of the students are from another race, and culture. The population served by Talent Search is two-thirds low-income and first generation college student, a high-rate of Hispanic students, white students, majority of females over males, some behavioral issues, a few African Americans, and different cultures including India, Ethiopia, and Syria.

I have found working with these students to be very refreshing and exciting. To hear the excitement and the stories coming from them, even the ones who come in and say, “I am so tired, I have to work all the time” and I explain tell them “you are too young to be tired all the time” and when I ask them how they are I explain saying you are tired is not an emotion and doesn’t count as answer. I enjoy how they laugh at me and change their answers. It is nice to hear their laughs and visions of the futures, so very different then what is portrayed all over the news.

I would to say the wrong thing to a person and offend them or cause them to not return while I am there. Or to use an offensive tone, or not understand their culture and use to much direct eye contact or not enough. I tend to be a direct person and because I can’t always hear when there is background noise I must look at the person when they are speaking I come across a little intimidating when I do not mean to. I am worried about that too.

I would like to improve my communication skills and interpersonal skills when working with students and other staff members at the school. Heather stated that I would take over last week, however, the trip took up most of last week and she will be gone Monday. I am hoping to be in contact again with her on Tuesday in the office and do our first agenda meeting and get clarity on that.

Overall, I am grateful for the opportunity to work with Heather at Trio and all the students. I do enjoy the students and I have found that I could see myself working with adolescence as a possibility. I have narrowed down my where to land when I graduate options to two population groups, opposite, but hey at least I am getting somewhere.

Client Intervention Outline

  1. What is the client situation?
    1. An ESL Tutor referred a student to Trio Talent Search for assistance due to previous incidences the client is being refused assistance by guidance counselors. The client is not a Trio student, however, as an intern, I am able to assist the client and have accepted to work with him. Client is a legal resident of the United States, he is currently living with his father client believes within the next two months it is possible that his mother and siblings will be in the country. Since he is not sure if this will be the situation or not it has caused a delay on his college selection, financial aid, and future.
  2. What is the selected intervention?
    1. The selected intervention for the client is to apply to a community college in his local community, apply for the community college he would like to attend, apply for financial aid listing both schools, and proceed forward with college plans.
  • Provide the rationale for the selected intervention.
    1. The rationale for the intervention was selected based on the client stating that citizenship for his family has been deferred several times in the past. Indicating that it is not guaranteed that his mother and siblings will be in America within two months or before the next school year begins. Having the client apply for a local college and the college he would like to attend in addition to listing both schools on the financial aid application assures client has secured college plans for next school year regardless of families’ immigration status.
  1. Describe the process for the intervention.
    1. During the first session, the client and the helper met to discuss the clients’ situation. It was during this session that the helper could get a clearer picture of what the client was dealing with outside of applying for college. During this session, the client explained the situation with the family and how that could impact his college plans. He left with some ideas to discuss with his father and was asked to return a week later. At this session, the client and the helper discussed the options and the client felt that it would be best to apply to the local community college and the community college that he wanted to attend that was further away and asked for help on the application process.
  2. Analyze the outcome of the intervention.
    1. The client successfully applied to both the local community college and the community college that was farther away from his home. Both colleges accepted client. The client has not successfully completed the financial aid portion of the college requirement, the helper has explained to the client what information is missing. The client has set up two appointments to bring in W2 and has not arrived to complete the process and the client is aware that without this information he is losing a significant Pell Grant for college.
  3. Provide the evidenced based practice knowledge to support your chosen intervention.
    1. The client is a permanent United States citizen, a first-generation college student, and he and his father are a low-income household. Research over the last decade indicate that this group of students is severely underrepresented by post-secondary institutions (Educational Research Institute of America, 2015).
  • Provide practice based information which may inform the evidence based approach to the intervention.
    1. An academic research study looked at the evidence-based practice knowledge on low-income and first-generation students. The research study conducted looked at three aspects of this population academic, financial, and social aspects of post-secondary education and formed a study on practice based knowledge that could then be integrated into the current evidence-based approach. (Educational Research Institute of America, 2015). Practice-based approaches include one-on-one advising more frequently than once a month, assisting students who are considered at risk with taking success courses, hosting intensive freshman seminars, and hosting money management workshops; these are only a few of the results listed in the study revealing an overhaul suggested in the public-school system (Educational Research Institute of America, 2015).
  • Provide alternative ideas about other possible interventions and give your rationales.
    1. I am not sure that I would have been able to offer many alternative interventions due to the client situation. The father does not speak English and he does not drive according to the client in addition to the possibility of his mother arriving from Ethiopia and possibly siblings too. This is an adjustment which the client was not ready to discuss so the focus and my internship is on academic success. The client was not consistent past applying for schools and his financial aid is not complete. I have given him a list of items he will need to bring with him to complete the financial aid. The client is aware that he is eligible for Pell Grants if the forms are completed, however, if not he will not receive the money.

Reference:

Educational Research Institute of America. (2015). Best practices for supporting low-income,           first-generation college students. [Manual]. Retrieved from                                     https://www.in.gov/che/files/ERIA_Report_Higher_Ed_Supports_Review_of_the_Resear

Client Intervention Outline 2

  1. What is the client situation?
    1. The client has been referred to TRIO Talent Search of Briar Cliff University by the graduation academy teacher. The client is a junior who has enough credits to graduate a year early and it has been brought to the teacher’s attention that the client has been kicked out of her mother’s home and is living in an apartment with her friends.
    2. During the initial intake meeting with the client we discussed the client’s living situation, financial, and educational situation. It was determined that the client had been living with her friends since prior to her 18th birthday and the school had been aware that the client was in danger of becoming homeless. The client is working and indicates she is living with roommates and not in any danger and is on track to graduate at the end of this school year.
    3. Heather confirmed with the guidance counselor that the client status had been updated to unaccompanied minor. She then verified that client’s academic credits were on track to graduate at the end of the school year and where the client was at for class rank and GPA.
    4. The next step was to confirm with the client what she wanted to do after graduation. Was she planning to go into the military and then college, go full time military, straight to work and so on.
  2. What is the selected intervention?
    1. The selected intervention based on the client assessment was to assist the client with selecting a college, filling out college forms, and applying for financial aid.
  3. Provide the rationale for the selected intervention.
    1. The rationale for the selected intervention was based on the client referral, working collaboratively with other departments, and the client assessment and decision to move in this direction.
  • Describe the process for the intervention.
    1. During the intervention, the client was asked to provide her social security card, resident status card, and tax documents. We explained to the client the reason this was necessary and it had to do with the IRS wanting to confirm she had income since she is an unaccompanied minor. The next step was to create a FASFA ID for her this took approximately three days to set-up and the client was asked to come back so that we could assist her with completing the form at which time the form was completed. The client decided she would like to attend Briar Cliff University and she was put into contact with Adam Corey the admissions representative.
  • Analyze the outcome of the intervention.
    1. The outcome was successful the client was accepted into Briar Cliff University, she was granted full Pell Grant and will attend with most her college tuition paid for. She is still one point off on her ACT test score and she is currently working with Adam on this aspect and will be taking this at Briar Cliff to pull that up.
  • Provide the evidenced based practice knowledge to support your chosen intervention.
    1. The client is a permanent United States citizen, a first-generation college student, and she is an unaccompanied minor which is considered a disadvantaged youth. Evidence based practice over the last decade indicate that this group of students is severely underrepresented by post-secondary institutions and when assisted with educational needs have a higher probability of gaining meaningful employment later in life (Educational Research Institute of America, 2015).
  1. Provide practice based information which may inform the evidence based approach to the intervention.
    1. An academic research study looked at evidence-based practice knowledge on low-income and first-generation students. The study looked at academic, financial, and social aspects of post-secondary education and formed a study on practice based knowledge that could then be integrated into the current evidence-based approach. (Educational Research Institute of America, 2015).
    2. Practice-based approaches include one-on-one advising more frequently than once a month, assisting students who are considered at risk with taking success courses, hosting intensive freshman seminars, and hosting money management workshops; these are only a few of the results listed in the study revealing an overhaul suggested in the public-school system (Educational Research Institute of America, 2015).
  • Provide alternative ideas about other possible interventions and give your rationales.
    1. In situations such as this it is difficult to provide alternative interventions which offer positive outcomes. One alternative would be military if the client was interested in serving in the military. Several students go this route regardless of their home life situation. Many students either feel a calling or a passion to serve their country or they want to serve for the college funds that are offered. This client had a solid idea of the route she wanted to take and she needed some guidance on how to get there.

Reference:

Educational Research Institute of America. (2015). Best practices for supporting low-income,           first-generation college students. [Manual]. Retrieved from                                     https://www.in.gov/che/files/ERIA_Report_Higher_Ed_Supports_Review_of_the_Resear

 

Monitoring Tool

Identify a change opportunity  
Identify change agent role  
Obtain Sanction  
What are the boundaries  
Who will be in the change system  
Preliminary data and research for change opportunity  
Survey-develop, get approval, distribute  
Set goals, objectives, and outcomes  
Determine change approach  
Design the approach and strategy  
Design structure if needed  
Determine resources for change opportunity  
Create budget for change opportunity and obtain approval  
Design the brochure for the change opportunity  
Receive approval from Mrs. Nissen and decision making committee for brochure  
Distribute brochure to target population – middle school students Talent Search  
Collect data from surveys  
Reassess change opportunity  
Make and document modifications to change opportunity based on assessment  

 

Social Media Survey: Student Intern Senior Project

Social Media

  • Do you have or use Facebook?
    • Yes
    • No
  • Do you have or use Snapchat?
    • Yes
    • No
  • Do you have or use twitter?
    • Yes
    • No
  • Do you have or use Instagram?
    • Yes
    • No

Personal Information posted on social media

  • Do you post your actual date of birth?
    • Yes
    • No
  • Is the name of your real hometown posted?
    • Yes
    • No
  • Is the name of the school you attend posted?
    • Yes
    • No
  • Do you post where you are going for example your activities, the time, and who you will be with? A basketball game, a dance, or going for a walk.
    • Yes
    • No
  • Do you post when you are struggling or having a tough time? For example, you are upset with a parent and you post that online? You and your best friend are fighting.
    • Yes
    • No

Privacy Settings

  • Do you use the privacy settings on your social media applications?
    • Yes
    • No
  • Do you know why the privacy settings are available?
    • Yes
    • No
  • Do you know or understand how to use the privacy settings?
    • Yes
    • No
  • Do you block advertising on your applications?
    • Yes
    • No

 Reflection Journal One

Monday, January 23rd, 2017 (competencies 1c, 8c)

Today is the first day of practicum and it will be a slow week at the schools where I will work because of the new semester. I met administrative and counseling staff at North high school so that I could begin learning how TRIO Educational Talent Search uses inter-professional collaboration to achieve beneficial outcomes for the students.

Tuesday, January 24th, 2017 (competencies 1a, 1c, 7b, 7c, 8b, 8c)

My practicum incorporates working with middle school students one day per week. Today, I could see how TRIO Educational Talent Search uses inter-professional collaboration to achieve beneficial outcomes for students with staff and counselors at North middle school. This was observed through the student’s application and recruitment process, staff referral, counselor referral, and additional extenuating circumstances are like the high school.                          (

Wednesday, January 25th, 2017 (competencies 1a, 2a)

Today I researched the agencies funding sources, mission statement, eligibility requirements, program description, and academic-based curriculum in preparation for the change effort. To prepare myself the diversity and difference among students and their family I familiarized myself with the agencies grant.

Thursday, January 26th, 2017 (competencies 1a, 1b, 1c, 8b, 8c)

I attended a meeting with administrative staff from South Sioux City Community School District and TRIO Educational Talent Search of Briar Cliff University. The purpose of the meeting was to go over the agencies programs and what the administrative staff could do for the academic advisor to make Educational Talent Search more successful at their school.

Reflection Journal Two

Monday, January 30th, 2017 (competencies: 2a, 2b, 2c, 3a, 3b, 6a, 6b)

I observed and assisted students at East high school with mid-year grade reports, completing academic probation forms, and discussed how grades can impact a student’s future. I provided career counseling services and processed my first family needs assessment. I had my first experience interacting with students from other culture’s today and due to language barriers, students were experiencing issues completing their FASFA forms. Students expressed frustrations with their parent’s lack of concern for the required information, deadlines, or assistance. The academic advisor from TRIO resolved the issue by notifying students that she would send a letter to the parents explaining what was needed and why it would be needed and list her contact information.

Tuesday, January 31st, 2017 (competencies: 1b, 1c, 1e, 2c, 7a)

I assisted sixth-graders to complete their mid-year review and realized that this age group made me nervous. There were approximately five sixth-graders who were quiet and I was concerned my presence was not helping. Seeking guidance from my mentor she assured me this is typical behavior of the sixth-grade students and they will relax when I relax. I applied this guidance to my practice behavior with the seventh and eighth-graders, the students completed their paperwork, asked questions, and engaged in an open discussion with me.

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017 (competencies: 1a, 1b, 1e, 2a, 2b, 2c, 6a, 6b, 7b, 7c)

At North high school, I began interacting directly with students today. Senior students were called down for upcoming TRIO events, grades, scholarships, financial aid, and personal issues. Many students needed me to listen and hear what they had to say before focusing on TRIO related topics which allowed me to develop my helping skills. I was assured by my mentor that my feelings of discomfort would subside as I became more comfortable with students, their personalities, and their situations. An ESL student from Ethiopia was referred to me, I was notified that this student needed assistance completing his FASFA and possibly his application to college. After beginning the intake process with the student, he explained his family situation, his frustrations, and I realized that he was not ready to make this decision yet. Using helpings skills of probing, asking questions, and applying empathy he and I developed a temporary intervention goal which involved communicating with his father and meeting with me in one week.

Thursday, February 2nd, 2017 (competencies: 2a, 2b, 2c, 3a, 3b, 5a, 5b, 5c)

Today was an in-depth look at social injustice and economic injustice. One of the student’s I worked with has been a United States citizen for three years, completed her FASFA in October of 2016 and the college is requesting proof of citizenship (not the government providing the money), to allow the student to send a notarized copy rather than drive to Iowa State took several phone calls and documenting the calls. Next, a student has been using a false social security card and was not aware of this until she tried to apply for college. The counselors, administrative staff, and TRIO are working alongside the student to assist her with staying in the country and continue to college.

Reflection Journal Three

Monday, January 30th, 2017 (competencies: 2a, 2b, 2c, 3a, 3b, 6a, 6b)

I observed and assisted students at East high school with mid-year grade reports, completing academic probation forms, and discussed how grades can impact a student’s future. I provided career counseling services and processed my first family needs assessment. I had my first experience interacting with students from other culture’s today and due to language barriers, students were experiencing issues completing their FASFA forms. Students expressed frustrations with their parent’s lack of concern for the required information, deadlines, or assistance. The academic advisor from TRIO resolved the issue by notifying students that she would send a letter to the parents explaining what was needed and why it would be needed and list her contact information.

Tuesday, January 31st, 2017 (competencies: 1b, 1c, 1e, 2c, 7a)

I assisted sixth-graders to complete their mid-year review and realized that this age group made me nervous. There were approximately five sixth-graders who were quiet and I was concerned my presence was not helping. Seeking guidance from my mentor she assured me this is typical behavior of the sixth-grade students and they will relax when I relax. I applied this guidance to my practice behavior with the seventh and eighth-graders, the students completed their paperwork, asked questions, and engaged in an open discussion with me.

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017 (competencies: 1a, 1b, 1e, 2a, 2b, 2c, 6a, 6b, 7b, 7c)

At North high school, I began interacting directly with students today. Senior students were called down for upcoming TRIO events, grades, scholarships, financial aid, and personal issues. Many students needed me to listen and hear what they had to say before focusing on TRIO related topics which allowed me to develop my helping skills. I was assured by my mentor that my feelings of discomfort would subside as I became more comfortable with students, their personalities, and their situations. An ESL student from Ethiopia was referred to me, I was notified that this student needed assistance completing his FASFA and possibly his application to college. After beginning the intake process with the student, he explained his family situation, his frustrations, and I realized that he was not ready to make this decision yet. Using helpings skills of probing, asking questions, and applying empathy he and I developed a temporary intervention goal which involved communicating with his father and meeting with me in one week.

Thursday, February 2nd, 2017 (competencies: 2a, 2b, 2c, 3a, 3b, 5a, 5b, 5c)

Today was an in-depth look at social injustice and economic injustice. One of the student’s I worked with has been a United States citizen for three years, completed her FASFA in October of 2016 and the college is requesting proof of citizenship (not the government providing the money), to allow the student to send a notarized copy rather than drive to Iowa State took several phone calls and documenting the calls. Next, a student has been using a false social security card and was not aware of this until she tried to apply for college. The counselors, administrative staff, and TRIO are working alongside the student to assist her with staying in the country and continue to college.

Reflection Journal Four

Monday, February 6th, 2017 (competencies: 2b, 2c, 3a, 3b, 7a, 7b, 7c, 7d)

My week started out by applying my understanding social, economic, and environmental justice to advocate for human rights at both the micro and macro-level of social work. By assisting with the set-up of the traveling Human Trafficking display presented by the Siouxland Coalition Against Human Trafficking. I engaged in advocacy through self-education, encouraging students to view the display and was available to answer questions.

In the afternoon, I spent time with seniors who were struggling with college options. We spent time doing a strengths assessment, discussing family roles, possible college majors and began brainstorming college options that were realistic to the student. The students agreed to the possible college options (intervention possibilities) and agreed to discuss with their parents/guardians and meet with me next week.

Tuesday, February 7th, 2017 (competencies: 1a, 1b, 1c, 2a, 2b, 2c, 3a, 3b)

As chaperone of on an overnight trip to the State Capitol with 20 TRIO Educational Talent Search students, I had plenty of opportunities to apply competency practice behaviors. Throughout the trip I applied ethical conduct, professionalism in both oral and verbal communication, I was dressed appropriately and professionally and applied self-awareness and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism.

The students attending the trip attend three different high schools in the Siouxland school district and have a broad level of diversity amongst the students. The students got along very well together and did not leave another student out regardless of the diversity and difference amongst them. During separate times of the trip, I facilitated small social group conversations on immigration laws, officer shootings, gun control, and other social issues concerning the students. The students who participated were respectful of one another and were excellent participants.

Wednesday, February 8th, 2017 (competencies: 1b, 1c, 3a, 3b, 5a, 5b, 5c)

The use of reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations was demonstrated during the TRIO Days trip. A bill was being protested at the capitol today and it was important for me to not influence the students on whether they should be pro or con on the decision. I demonstrated professional demeanor in my behavior by dressing and speaking professionally.

Engaging in practices that advance social, economic, and environmental justice was seen through participation in attending TRIO Days an event designed to educate students on how TRIO Educational Talent Search is funded, how it started, the purpose of, and to thank the government officials who support the program. Engaging students in policy-practice, assessing social policy, where the policies are made, who to speak to, and some key starting points were gained during the TRIO Days trip to the capitol.

Thursday, February 9th, 2017 (competencies: 6a, 6b, 7a,7b, 7c)

Working with juniors today, I developed my practice skills of collecting, organizing, and critically analyzing data; applying knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, and developed mutually agreed on goals. They completed their mid-year reviews, discussed college choices, ACT options, upcoming college visits, and if they would be participating in the upcoming practice ACT.

I followed up with a student from Ethiopia to explain how to apply for scholarships after establishing his college ID. He and I discussed why he would need letters of recommendations, who would be appropriate to ask, and he did inform me that his situation at home is improving.

Reflection Journal Five

Monday, February 13th, 2017 (competencies: 2b, 2c, 3a, 3b, 7a, 7b, 7c, 7d)

My week started out by applying my understanding social, economic, and environmental justice to advocate for human rights at both the micro and macro-level of social work. By assisting with the set-up of the traveling Human Trafficking display presented by the Siouxland Coalition Against Human Trafficking. I engaged in advocacy through self-education, encouraging students to view the display and was available to answer questions.

In the afternoon, I spent time with seniors who were struggling with college options. We spent time doing a strengths assessment, discussing family roles, possible college majors and began brainstorming college options that were realistic to the student. The students agreed to the possible college options (intervention possibilities) and agreed to discuss with their parents/guardians and meet with me next week.

Tuesday, February 14th, 2017 (competencies: 1a, 1b, 1c, 2a, 2b, 2c, 3a, 3b)

As chaperone of on an overnight trip to the State Capitol with 20 TRIO Educational Talent Search students, I had plenty of opportunities to apply competency practice behaviors. Throughout the trip I applied ethical conduct, professionalism in both oral and verbal communication, I was dressed appropriately and professionally and applied self-awareness and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism.

The students attending the trip attend three different high schools in the Siouxland school district and have a broad level of diversity amongst the students. The students got along very well together and did not leave another student out regardless of the diversity and difference amongst them. During separate times of the trip, I facilitated small social group conversations on immigration laws, officer shootings, gun control, and other social issues concerning the students. The students who participated were respectful of one another and were excellent participants.

Wednesday, February 15th, 2017 (competencies: 1b, 1c, 3a, 3b, 5a, 5b, 5c)

The use of reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations was demonstrated during the TRIO Days trip. A bill was being protested at the capitol today and it was important for me to not influence the students on whether they should be pro or con on the decision. I demonstrated professional demeanor in my behavior by dressing and speaking professionally.

Engaging in practices that advance social, economic, and environmental justice was seen through participation in attending TRIO Days an event designed to educate students on how TRIO Educational Talent Search is funded, how it started, the purpose of, and to thank the government officials who support the program. Engaging students in policy-practice, assessing social policy, where the policies are made, who to speak to, and some key starting points were gained during the TRIO Days trip to the capitol. Engaged students in policy-practice by participating in the debate process being held at the capitol; the bill being debated was the “collective bargaining bill”.

Thursday, February 16th, 2017 (competencies: 6a, 6b, 7a,7b, 7c)

Working with juniors today, I developed my practice skills of collecting, organizing, and critically analyzing data; applying knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, and developed mutually agreed on goals. They completed their mid-year reviews, discussed college choices, ACT options, upcoming college visits, and if they would be participating in the upcoming practice ACT.

I followed up with a student from Ethiopia to explain how to apply for scholarships after establishing his college ID. He and I discussed why he would need letters of recommendations, who would be appropriate to ask, and he did inform me that his situation at home is improving.

Reflection Journal Six

Monday, February 27th, 2017 (competencies: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 6a, 6b, 7d,)

Chaperoning forty students on two campus tours today allowed me the opportunity to engage with students using a variety of practice behaviors. Today I applied human behavior and the social environment to engage students the value of choosing a postsecondary school that is right for them. Through researching the size of the campus, financial assistance, costs, peer support, and does the school offer the right programs. Many of the students were making decisions that would impact their future using empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills I effectively guided students through their conflicts to select an appropriate strategy. Today, I demonstrated my ethical and professional skills through my conduct with my peers, students, and college advisors. My dress attire appropriately represented TRIO Education Talent Search and I sought feedback when questions came up that I was unsure of.

Tuesday, February 28th, 2017 (competencies: 6a, 6b, 8c)

Working with the seventh and eighth grade students strengthened my practice behaviors for competencies 6a and 6b. Applying human behavior and the social environment to engage students was demonstrated when I met with the seventh-grade students to learn about the dynamics of their world, their home lives and how that relates that impacts school. Observing and shadowing my mentor shows the value of inter-professional collaboration to benefit students.

 March 3rd, 2017 (competencies: 4a, 4b, 4c, 9a, 9b, 9c)

Began the day with a planning meeting for the macro-level change process to discuss methods of evaluation for the student survey that will be administered. The second item discussed was who would administer the surveys and the number to be used. The planning committee discussed options for implementing the change based on projections of the change outcome.

Saturday, March 4th, 2017 (competencies: 3b)

Engaged in practices that advanced social, economic, and environmental justice by participating as a Proctor for a practice ACT test. The test was offered as free trial run for participating students of TRIO who would receive their scores, their response sheets, the original test, and sheet explaining with the correct answers and why they are correct.

Reflection Journal Seven

Monday, March 6th, 2017 (competencies: 3a, 3b, 4b)

I met new students today having gone to a different school in the district to promote upcoming activities for TRIO. Applying my understanding of social, economic, and environmental justice I advocated for student’s rights for individual and system levels by promoting better education to students from disadvantaged backgrounds. Used evidence-based practice to promote human well-being by promoting postsecondary education to aid the advancement of social and economic justice through participation of the program and college visits.

Wednesday, March 8th, 2017 (competencies: 7a, 7b, 7c, 7d)

Assessing individual students by facilitating small groups discussions; students were challenged to critically analyze their futures from a strengths perspective, we then discussed personality types, and how that might relate to potential future careers. Some students set goals, tasks, and activities required to implement the career and others stopped with the idea.

Thursday, March 9th, 2017 (competencies: 7a, 7b, 7c, 7d)

I facilitated small group discussions with sophomores and touched base on their school needs, home needs, upcoming events with the agency and their home lives. Next, we discussed summer plans and moved into identifying potential needs from the agency over the summer. We also played a learning activity game, went over the value of helping friends, and brain development.

Reflection Journal Eight

Monday, March 13th, 2017 (competencies: 9a, 9b, 9c)

Reviewed the social media survey designed for the macro-level change effort. After conducting an analysis of the qualitative and quantitative data the research presented limitations that required approval from the sanctioning system. To move forward with the change effort the the change agent will requested a more in depth, research based change, offering a brochure rather than a bookmark for students. The change agent provided the necessary limitations that research data concluded, all modifications that would be made, and new time periods, the change agent did receive approval from the sanctioning system.

Tuesday, March 14th, 2017 (competencies: 3a, 3b, 6a, 6b)

Facilitated social conversation groups with sixth, seventh, and eighth grade students. Eighth-grade students were asked to complete career assessment and personal aptitude sheet before we began our group conversation. Beginning with the career assessment, students were stuck on future careers they could not see past the “popular” careers such as medical field, law, teaching, engineering etc. We discussed how to think freely and why it is important to begin thinking about the future, however, it does not mean they cannot change their mind in the future. Next, students struggled with personal aptitude and the way the section is designed is five you are good at and five areas of improvement. Students automatically went to school subjects and they were quickly veered away from that by me. Once the majority became stumped I had the group work help one another after explaining what the sections were looking for.

Reflection Journal Nine

Monday, March 20th, 2017 (competencies: 3a, 3b, 5a, 5b, 5c)

Followed up with students who had applied for had applied to colleges and universities, submitted financial applications, were offered scholarships for athletics, and other scholarships or financial awards to provide our aid covering the material they received. Students were given a sheet resembling a financial award letter, we discussed loans, interest rates, grants and scholarships.

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017 (competencies: 7a, 7b, 7c, 7d)

A student from Ethiopia brought paperwork to complete his FASFA today, however, when we worked on his financial aid previously an ID had not been established yet. After he and I discussed the situation, organized the data, verified that we had the information including email addresses for the necessary parties we began the process. Understanding that the student is easily frustrated I applied my knowledge of human behavior considered the social environment and went to a quieter location and decrease student’s frustration levels. The student needed to create the ID’s and became agitated when I would not do it for him, however, through discussing his goals, the reasons why he needed to learn to do this for himself the student chose to take the challenge of learning to complete the FASFA ID process on himself. The client agreed to return the following week for a follow-up intervention strategy which will be to complete the remaining steps and call to confirm admission to selected school.

Friday, March 25th, 2017 (competencies: 3a, 3b, 5c, 8c)

Participated as a presenter during the Mentors in Youth Violent Prevention Program with three Siouxland school district librarians/educators. The MVP Summit educates junior students in three Siouxland high schools who will mentor incoming freshmen next year in violence prevention advocacy. Our room presented three times on “Human Trafficking and the Consequences of Social Media”. Using curriculum from an Iowa organization dedicated to fighting human trafficking, a simple project using red sand to visually demonstrate human trafficking, educating on myths, and using a PowerPoint to guide a powerful discussion offered up to 40 students per group the following information; basic overview of what human trafficking is, why they do it, why victims don’t leave, the jobs victims are forced into, how human traffickers have taken advantage of social media, how they can stay protect themselves on social media, and open discussion.

Reflection Journal Thirteen

Tuesday, April 18th, 2017 (competencies: 8e, 9a, 9b, 9c)

Using social conversation groups the macro-level change effort was implemented today. Participating students were in sixth, seventh, and eighth-grade and the goal was to educate young teens who are unknowingly exploiting vulnerabilities to human traffickers through social media applications. Today’s group received an educational brochure before the discussion began to determine if the material would enhance the discussion, observations were made, and documented.

Wednesday, April 19th, 2017 (competencies: 8e, 9a, 9b, 9c)

The second phase of the macro-level change effort was implemented today. Like yesterday the method was the same, students grade levels were the same and the goal was the same. The difference was when they received the material and this occurred towards the end of the discussion rather than the beginning. The results were critically analyzed, reviewed, documented, and adjustments will be implemented for future presentations and discussions.

Thursday, April 20th, 2017 (competencies: 8e)

Today was my last day of internship and saying goodbye to the students, administrative staff, and educators. I facilitated effective transitions and endings by notifying the persons before that this would occur today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Comptetency Skillset Pre-Practicum

Competency 1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior

The NASW Code of Ethics provides the guidelines that regulate acceptable ethical behavior. Each social work course I have taken at Briar Cliff University has applied the code of ethics in various settings which I believe I have become adept at applying in my personal life. In research projects, class discussions, decision making, and during agency visits I have applied ethical standards in their appropriate context.

Prior to beginning social work courses at Briar Cliff University, I actively used self-reflection and self-regulation daily for self-improvement and have applied this concept to my academic and professional endeavors as well. I dress appropriately and have effective written communication.

Competency 2: Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice

My education and life experiences have shown me the beauty of diversity and difference. Going into my practicum I plan to experience and see significant growth in my practice with engaging diverse and different populations at both the micro and macro-levels in social work.  in regards to shaping life experiences in practice.

Competency 3: Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice

Each person, no matter their position, has fundamental human rights to freedom, safety, privacy, health care, and education. I have no experience advocating for human rights, environmental rights, or political activism. I currently have advocated on behalf of women with addiction, alcoholics, rape victims, and domestic violent victims at the micro-level in a person capacity. Currently, I have not had the opportunity to engage in social work practices that will advance social, economic, and/or environmental justice.

Competency 4: Engage in Practice-Informed Research and Research-Informed Practice

I have a solid understanding of the differences and values of qualitative and quantitative research methods. I have a good grasp on translating research findings into practice. The principal areas of practice-informed research were learned during my research methods course. I understand the concepts of how to apply practice-informed research into service.

Competency 5: Engage in Policy Practice

Several courses I have taken at Briar Cliff have prepared me for understanding the various aspects of engaging in policy practice. I understand the various levels of social welfare, how social policies are created and implemented, and the history of social services. The social policy analysis course at Briar Cliff has prepared me to critically analyze social policy that impacts the delivery of social services.

Competency 6: Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, Communities

My learning curriculum at Briar Cliff University has placed a great emphasis on the NASW Code of Ethics. These core principles of social work provide the general tools needed for engaging with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Each social work course taken at Briar Cliff University enhanced these principles and has taught me to apply them in a social environment.

Competency 7: Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Briar Cliff Universities social work core courses, practicum courses, and human behavior in the social work environment are primary examples of course study which focus on this competency. Each course provided the groundwork to understanding theories of human behavior, assessing clients, and applying this knowledge into field practice. The practice course was especially helpful at guiding me through the process of collecting and organizing data and interpreting information from clients. My skill level for the competency has been in a classroom environment rather than with clients.

Competency 8: Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, Communities

 I have the general concepts, guidelines, and theories grounded in social work pertaining to intervention with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. I have worked with clients using skillsets in negotiating, mediating, or advocating and I am eager to apply these skills to social work practice.

Competency 9: Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, or Communities

My educational experience at Briar Cliff University has prepared me to enter my practicum where I will fine-tune this competency. The practicum and macro-level change process will enhance this competency, my experience, skillset, and prepare my ability to be effective my future employer.